The effectiveness of using social media to promote the Carbon Tax policy

Carbontaxstatspng

Using publically available tools (Twitalyzer, Klout and Peerindex) so you can investigate the data further for yourselves, here is a simpe metrics-based comparison of the CEF and SYA on Twitter. I used DBCDE as a benchmark.

One of the standout differences are in the:

  • Twitalyzer influence and engagement scores (SYA has the highest influence, at 2.0%, but DBCDE has a much higher engagement score than either).
  • The DBCDE’s benchmark PeerIndex is much higher (and CEF has a line of zero’s).

Influence and engagement are:

  • Engagement provides a measure of the type of interaction the user has in Twitter by examining the ratio of people referenced by the user to the number of people referencing them.
  • Influence is the likelihood that a Twitter user will either A) retweet something the user has written or B) reference the user.

PeerIndex’s score is described as follows:

Your overall PeerIndex score is a relative measure of your online authority. This score reflects the impact of your online activities, and the extent to which you have built up social and reputational capital on the web.

At its heart PeerIndex addresses the fact that merely being popular (or having gamed the system) doesn’t indicate authority. Instead we build up your authority finger print on a category-by-category level using eight benchmark topics.

Someone, however, cannot be authority without a receptive audience. We don’t simply mean a large audience but one that listens and is receptive. To capture this aspect PeerIndex Rank includes the audience score we calculate for each profile.

Finally, we include the activity score so account for someone who is active has a greater share of attention of people interested in the topics they are interested in.

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2 thoughts on “The effectiveness of using social media to promote the Carbon Tax policy

  1. These numbers and percentages don’t mean anything to me without a frame of reference. That is, I don’t know how to use them.

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